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My daughter Audrey died way too young.  She was very artistic dating to early childhood, later excelling with the camera, producing mostly black and white images in her own unique style.  She modified many in the dark room. Her emphasis was clearly on the “B” half of “B&W.”  I have scanned several of her photographs on my computer.  Please click on her picture a view some of her work

 
 
I took the Bryce Canyon photo in 2007, in fact several.  But I couldn’t connect with any.  This one in particular was too broad, covered too much. I tried multiple crops, and performed the usual Photoshop manipulations.  Nothing.  In retrospect I know I was influenced by pictures from other artists – big mistake.  There are tons of gorgeous cropped shots of individual or a few rock formations.  But for me that morning was not about small but about big.  As the sun came up the entire canyon opened up.  Recently I went back over my rejects (and there are many) and begin looking at this picture differently.  How about the whole thing?  Morning light just a moment before the first sun rays appear over the horizon.  An Olympic Stadium, the Roman Colosseum.  So I accepted the full monty, but now had another problem.  What about that aggravating small tree in the mid-foreground?  This breaks composition rules.  So I tried cropping it out but lost the “stadium” appearance that I wanted.  So I cloned it out:
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Bryce Canyon
But now there was an unappealing rather large area of mostly “nothing” in the right foreground.  Okay, what about moving the tree?

Sitting in the lower right corner, it fits into the standard “rules.”  But I couldn’t see it there.  Out of place.  Did it really add value?  Finally I went back to my Colosseum comparison.  Where would I be sitting?  Right there in the middle foreground, taking in this spectacular view.  The tree is Me.  Bring on the Olympians.


 

Richard Gaston Photography